Archive for November, 2012

47th Tip of 50 by Kurt Billings

Friday, November 30th, 2012

This is a reprint of an article posted by Kurt Billings, co-author of Mold: The War Within. Thanks to Kurt for his recommendations. Please check out his Facebook page for a ongoing educational blog.

TIP OF THE DAY:

Day 47 of Our 50 Days of Fun—no sugar/no grains. Building a house or making repairs to an already existing house can be a daunting task. There are so many choices to research and decisions to make. Even more overwhelming,  is trying to make sure that the choices we make will result in a mold-free structure for years of problem-free living.

Preventing structural mold in our homes and work places is imperative to maintaining a healthy quality of indoor air. Many structural mold problems begin innocently enough—a threaded pipe under the sink becomes unscrewed causing water to leak into the cabinet, a crack forms in the wax ring under the toilet allowing water to leak into the flooring and subflooring, or blowing rainwater enters under a front or back door where the weatherstripping has become cracked and dried with age. Other times, structural mold is a direct result of errors made in the design stage or during the construction process.

How do we, as mere lay people—non contractors—protect ourselves and our properties from these all-too-commonly occurring maintenance and construction mishaps? It’s not likely we can become experts in all phases of the remodeling or building processes, but some helpful tips from someone who is an expert in mold-free construction can give us the shortcut to knowledge that will work for our tight-schedules.

Such invaluable tips can conveniently be found in the book, Mold-free Construction, which is authored by Doug Hoffman, Executive Director of the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI). His straight-to-the-point advice is drawn from his years of experience as a professional in the building industry with certifications and licenses as a general contractor, roofing contractor, plumbing contractor, indoor air quality consultant, mold inspector and remediator. As the head of NORMI, Mr. Hoffman is a uniquely qualified expert to guide us, the property owners, through the process of creating a mold-free structure.

In Mold-Free Construction, Mr. Hoffman addresses the decisions property owners face in all facets of the building process and details the impact each decision has on the goal of creating a mold-free structure:

• Lot selection, grading and drainage
• Foundation considerations
• The “dry-in” stage
• Plumbing considerations
• Roofing considerations
• HVAC considerations
• Indoor air quality considerations
• Finishes and furnishing considerations

The best time to educate ourselves regarding the many subspecialties in home construction and remodeling is before design and construction begins. We can’t rely on budget-focused general contractors or time-pressed crews. We have to become knowledgeable ourselves about the details that make a difference in creating a mold-free home or workplace. We don’t want to learn the hard way—as it can not only put our pocketbooks in peril but also our health in distress.

Mold-Free Construction is now available on Kindle for only $4.99; and Amazon Prime members can “borrow” it for free. Just click on this embedded link:

 

NORMIProETF Free Seminars Help Hurricane Sandy Victims

Saturday, November 17th, 2012

November 16, 2012 (New Brunswick, NJ)—The first of a series of FREE online seminars to help victims of Hurricane Sandy were held by the NORMIPro Environmental TASC Force (www.NORMIProETF.org) on Friday, November 16, 2012. Lance Eisen, Executive Director of the TASC Force, interviewed a panel of national experts who presented information to help hard-hit Sandy residents more effectively cope with the challenges that resulted from the devastation of one of the worst hurricanes to ever hit the Northeastern seaboard.

The panel included Doug Hoffman, Executive Director of the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (www.NORMI.org) who discussed the importance of understanding how to deal with the rebuilding process when professional contractors are hard to find. “NORMI has done some of the most comprehensive training in mold remediation techniques in the industry today,” said Hoffman. “Homeowners need to know how to do the work themselves or understand the process well enough to be sure that those who are doing the work are doing it properly to protect themselves and their employees from the harmful effect of mold and bacteria contamination and to be sure that the structure will be safe for the occupants. Our discounted online training, available at www.BestTrainingSchool.com and my book, Mold-Free Construction, available at www.Amazon.com are full of invaluable information to help the homeowner through this rebuilding process.”

Mr. Eisen also interviewed Dr. Doris Rapp, a Board Certified Pediatric Physician who has dedicated her life to helping diagnose allergic reactions. “My book Is This Your Child’s World talks about the unrecognized effects of mold contamination,” said Dr. Rapp. “My website at www.DrRapp.com is full of great information to help people realize that reactions to poor environments are real and can have long-lasting effects on anyone, even if they don’t already have asthma or allergies.”

During the one-hour segment, Lee Ann Billings, co-author of Mold: The War Within, Lessons Learned from Katrina, expressed her concerns about people in groups she calls “hidden high-risk groups”. Ms. Billings said, “All high-risk groups should be careful to protect themselves by either staying out of mold-contaminated environments or by creating a clean sleeping room to lessen the amount of mold and bacteria contaminants in the air they are breathing.” She suggests this can be done very inexpensively with the right kind of air purification technologies. Lee Ann, her husband Kurt, and their children became ill from mold and chemical exposures as a result of Hurricane Katrina and, now recovered, they help as victim’s advocates sharing information that is often difficult to dig out from the overabundance of misinformation that seems to follow these kinds of events.

Mr. Eisen also spoke with Linda Eicher, a certified disaster recovery expert, who shared valuable information about preparedness and what steps should be taken immediately following such a disaster. “Resources are often hard to find,” said Ms. Eicher. “However, there are often people willing to give of their time and money to assist those who have been left homeless and simply need some financial assistance to get them through events like this.”

“The NORMIPro Environmental TASC Force has provided information to the public and will continue to do so through free seminars. NORMIPro Environmental TASC Force members are also available to provide information to the media,” Mr. Eisen states. “It is our goal to help as many people as we can. We feel these free seminars are a first step in the right direction.”

For more information about upcoming events, donation outlets or to schedule a seminar in your area, please contact Lance Eisen at lance@NORMIProETF.org or call 877.751.3100

Mold-Free Consruction Promoted By Expert Author

Friday, November 16th, 2012

REPOST from Kurt Billing Facebook Blog
TIP OF THE DAY:

Day 47 of Our 50 Days of Fun—no sugar/no grains. Building a house or making repairs to an already existing house can be a daunting task. There are so many choices to research and decisions to make. Even more overwhelming,
is trying to make sure that the choices we make will result in a mold-free structure for years of problem-free living.

Preventing structural mold in our homes and work places is imperative to maintaining a healthy quality of indoor air. Many structural mold problems begin innocently enough—a threaded pipe under the sink becomes unscrewed causing water to leak into the cabinet, a crack forms in the wax ring under the toilet allowing water to leak into the flooring and subflooring, or blowing rainwater enters under a front or back door where the weatherstripping has become cracked and dried with age. Other times, structural mold is a direct result of errors made in the design stage or during the construction process.

How do we, as mere lay people—non contractors—protect ourselves and our properties from these all-too-commonly occurring maintenance and construction mishaps? It’s not likely we can become experts in all phases of the remodeling or building processes, but some helpful tips from someone who is an expert in mold-free construction can give us the shortcut to knowledge that will work for our tight-schedules.

Such invaluable tips can conveniently be found in the book, Mold-free Construction, which is authored by Doug Hoffman, Executive Director of the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (NORMI). His straight-to-the-point advice is drawn from his years of experience as a professional in the building industry with certifications and licenses as a general contractor, roofing contractor, plumbing contractor, indoor air quality consultant, mold inspector and remediator. As the head of NORMI, Mr. Hoffman is a uniquely qualified expert to guide us, the property owners, through the process of creating a mold-free structure.

In Mold-free Construction, Mr. Hoffman addresses the decisions property owners face in all facets of the building process and details the impact each decision has on the goal of creating a mold-free structure:

• Lot selection, grading and drainage
• Foundation considerations
• The “dry-in” stage
• Plumbing considerations
• Roofing considerations
• HVAC considerations
• Indoor air quality considerations
• Finishes and furnishing considerations

The best time to educate ourselves regarding the many subspecialties in home construction and remodeling is before design and construction begins. We can’t rely on budget-focused general contractors or time-pressed crews. We have to become knowledgeable ourselves about the details that make a difference in creating a mold-free home or workplace. We don’t want to learn the hard way—as it can not only put our pocketbooks in peril but also our health in distress.

Mold-free Construction is now available on Kindle for only $4.99; and Amazon Prime members can “borrow” it for free. Just click on the below link:

http://www.amazon.com/Mold-Free-Construction-ebook/dp/B00A6C4W4M/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1352751473&sr=1-1&keywords=mold+free+construction

NORMI Helps in NJ with Flooding

Friday, November 9th, 2012

As many New Jerseyans are being allowed back into their water-logged homes, they’re dealing with a new problem they many not have anticipated: mold.

But, there are a few simple steps homeowners can take to prevent thousands of dollars in structural damage.

“In order to grow, mold has to have moisture,” said Doug Hoffman, executive director of the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors. “It can get its moisture from an on-going water event, from material that has been soaked or from relative humidity in the air. Whatever steps can be taken to first stop the source of moisture, that has to be a major step in the right direction.”

“You never know what kind of mold you’re dealing with so you want to protect yourself by using a good mask and gloves,” said Hoffman. “Once you are protected, you need to remove standing water, wet carpets, rugs and personal belongings and start up some fans and heaters. If you can use heat along with the movement of air and dehumidification, it will dry out the area much, much quicker.”

When starting the cleaning process, you should never use bleach. “Bleach doesn’t actually kill the mold. It simply makes it go clear. When it comes back, it may be worse than it was before. We recommend highly that people use good enzyme cleaners that don’t have volatile organic compounds,” said Hoffman.

Hoffman offers the following tips:

1. Remove standing water-remove wet carpets, rugs, draperies, personal belongings (if possible) and exterior mulch against the foundation walls, etc., to allow the subflooring and foundation to dry.

2. Dry the structure out as quickly as possible-this is the most important thing you can do as structural mold will begin to form in the first 24-48 hours. Remove water-saturated sheetrock 18 inches above the highest watermark to increase structural drying.

3. Turn up the heat and use a dehumidifier-when drying out a structure and/or its contents, reduce the indoor humidity to less than 60% and use heat to speed the drying process. Hot, dry air dries things faster than cold moist air.

4. Circulate the air-turn on fans and dehumidifiers or open windows if there is no electricity to get air moving around to increase drying.

5. Don’t seal it up until its dry-siding, sheetrock, and flooring repairs should be done only after the substrates are completely dry. Only use plastic to prevent further water damage.

6. Don’t use bleach. It is an effective sanitizer but will not remove mold at its root. The mold will look like its gone but it won’t be.

7. Check your attic. Undetected roof leaks can become big structural mold problems later

8. Inspect windows on the outside of the structure-check for possible water seepage through the caulking/seals.

9. Remove all mold growth on building materials by mechanical means-such as sanding or complete removal.

10. Use sanitizers on any portion of the structure contaminated by sewage or flood waters.

For more information on water damage and flood resources, visit www.Flood.NORMI.org or to locate a certified mold inspector or remediator in your area, log onto www.normipro.com or call 1-877-251-2296.

This article reproduced from www.NJ101.5.com

PerfectFit Filter Awarded Honorable Mention at AHR 2013

Thursday, November 8th, 2012

WESTPORT, Connecticut…November 7, 2012 — Ranging from an innovative geothermal heat pump to a copper theft deterrent system, the winners of the prestigious 2013 AHR Expo Innovation Awards have been chosen and will be honored at a special ceremony during the world’s largest HVACR exposition and conference in Dallas on January 29th.
Representing a broad cross-section of the HVACR marketplace, the winning entries were selected in 10 categories and represent the most innovative new products among the thousands that will be displayed at the Show. A panel of judges made up of ASHRAE members evaluated the products submitted based on innovation, application, value to the user and market impact.
The 2013 AHR Expo Innovation Award winners by category are:

Building Automation
Company: CopperWatcher LLC
Product: CopperWatcher Model CW-3, an A/C copper theft deterrent system

Cooling
Company: Rheem Manufacturing Company
Product: H2AC Rooftop Unit, a restaurant integrated AC and water heating system

Green Building
Company:Titus
Product: Solar Plexicon, displacement ventilation diffuser with light-powered, energy harvesting
Capabilities

Heating
Company: ClimateMaster, Inc.
Product: Trilogy™ 40 Series, geothermal heat pump

Indoor Air Quality
Company: Energy Wall
Product: Energy Wall, a high efficiency heat & moisture recovery plate exchanger, air purifier &
dehumidifier

Plumbing
Company: Navien America, Inc.
Product: NPE-240A NG, condensing tankless gas water heater

Refrigeration
Company: Danfoss
Product: ADAP-KOOL AK-PC 781 Integrated Pack Controller

Software
Company: NexTraq
Product: NexTraq Fleet Tracking, web-based GPS software

Tools & Instruments
Company: Fluke Corporation
Product: Fluke 805 Vibration Meter

Ventilation
Company: American ALDES Ventilation Compamy
Product: Zone Register Terminal-2 (ZRT-2)

One of these 10 category winners will also be selected as the overall winner of the 2013 AHR Expo Product of the Year Award. Winners receive placards to display at their booths during the Show as well as an etched crystal award to be displayed at their company’s headquarters. In addition, 33 other products are recognized with Honorable Mentions in these same 10 categories and will also be given placards to display in their booths.
More than $10,000 generated by the entry fees will be donated to a charitable organization in the Dallas area. Since the inception of the Innovation Award Competition in 2003, well over $100,000 has been donated to charities and educational institutions in the cities where the Expo was held.
The 33 HONORABLE MENTIONS go to:

Building Automation
Company Product
American Auto-Matrix vSTAT, mobile application for commercial
building automation & control
CAN2GO (SCL Elements Inc.) TE2 Wireless Terminal Equipment Controller
LUDECA, Inc. VIBCONNECT RF, wireless online condition
monitoring system

Strobic Air Corporation Tri-Stack Smart System, a control system to maintain
Safe lab exhaust conditions
WattStopper Digital Lighting Management, Universal Dimming
Room Controller

Cooling
Carrier Corporation WeatherExpert 48LC, 50LC, single packaged
commercial rooftop unit
Danfoss VZH Inverter Scroll Compressor Solution
Mits Airconditioning Inc./Aermec S.P.A NRP AERMEC, air to water heat pump
Motivair Corporation Chilled Door
Trane Series S Cen TraVac, water-cooled oil-free centrifugal
Chiller

Green Building
Emerson Climate Technologies Copeland Scroll condensing unit – FFAP series
International Wastewater Heat Exchange Sewage SHARC, combination sewage filter/heat
Systems Inc. exchanger
RGF Environmental Group, Inc. PTAC PHI Cell, a PTAC HVAC air purification system
Spartan Peripheral Devices ME8400 Thermopyla Series, self-powered control
valve with bidirectional communication
Tate EcoCore, access floor panel incorporating micro-
encapsulated phase change materials

Heating
American Combustion Technologies SLE Ultra Low NOx Burner
LG Electronics U.S.A., Inc. Art Cool Gallery with Inverter, a heat pump system
with picture frame
WaterFurnace International, Inc. 7 Series 700A11, variable capacity geothermal heat
pump
WILO USA LLC Wilo Stratos GIGA, high-efficiency inline circulator

IAQ
Best Living Systems, LLC PerfectFit Filter, for return plenum
Carlisle HVAC Products Spray-Seal, job-site duct sealant
Smart Fog Inc. TS100 In-Duct Humidifier
Triatomic Environmental Inc. Fresh-Aire MINI UV, a miniature germicidal UVC light
system

Plumbing
Grand Hall / Eternal Hybrid Eternal GU100 Hybrid Water Heater
Midsun Specialty Products, Inc. Perfect Pitch, tool for condensate/waste piping
installation
Pro Hydronic Specialties AFL Series, automatic flow limiting device

Refrigeration
Emerson Climate Technologies Copeland Discus R410A Compressor, semi-hermetic
Sporlan – Parker Hannifin Secondary Fluid Valve (SFV) and Controller, a
stepper motor valve and controller
Software
Browning / Emerson Power Transmission Toolbox Technician App, a mobile app for HVACR
Solutions technicians

FieldAware FieldAware, cloud-based software for field service
Management

Instruments
Emerson Climate Technologies Emerson SureSwitch relay CoreSense protection
module, aftermarket air conditioning and heat pump
replacement contactors
Goodway Technologies Corp. CoilPro HiFlo, portable thick coil washing system

Ventilation
Titus EOS, solar-powered, energy harvesting diffuser

The Innovation Awards are jointly sponsored by ASHRAE; the Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI); and the International Exposition Company (IEC), producers and organizers of the AHR Expo.
The 2013 AHR Expo will feature more than 1,800 leading manufacturers and suppliers from around the world, showcasing hundreds of innovative new products to nearly 45,000 industry professionals. The 2013 AHR Expo is co-sponsored by ASHRAE and the Air-Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI). The Heating, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Institute of Canada (HRAI) is an honorary sponsor. ASHRAE’s Winter Conference is held concurrently with the AHR Expo each year. For more information visit the Show’s website at www.ahrexpo.com.
# # #
ABOUT AHR EXPO
As the largest and most comprehensive HVACR exposition, the AHR Expo attracts tens of thousands of attendees from all facets of the industry, including contractors, engineers, dealers, distributors, wholesalers, OEMs, architects, builders, industrial plant operators, facility owners and managers, agents and reps.

Since 1930, the AHR Expo has been the HVACR professional’s best resource for new products, new ideas and new services. It’s a hands-on, interactive event that showcases a wide spectrum of equipment, systems, and components. This unique industry forum creates a dynamic marketing environment unequaled in size and scope by any other industry event.

The AHR Expo is produced and managed by International Exposition Company, 15 Franklin Street, Westport, CT 06880; telephone: 203-221-9232; fax: 203-221-9260; e-mail: info@ahrexpo.com; website: www.ahrexpo.com.

Hurricane Sandy: Top Ten Tips to Avoid Structural Mold from Flooding

Wednesday, November 7th, 2012

October 31, 2012 (Abita Springs, LA)—A few simple steps can save property owners thousands of dollars of damage due to structural mold growth, according to Doug Hoffman, executive director of the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (www.NORMI.org), a nonprofit organization involved in providing training and certifications for mold and indoor air quality professionals. Taking the necessary steps to avoid structural mold growth will not only preserve the integrity of a building but also the health of its occupants, further explains Kurt and Lee Ann Billings, authors of the book MOLD: The War Within, which details lessons learned from Katrina. Disaster area residents must be proactive, act quickly, and use proper personal protection equipment when implementing the following ten steps:
1) Remove standing water—remove wet carpets, rugs, draperies, personal belongings (if possible) and exterior mulch against the foundation walls, etc., to allow the subflooring and foundation to dry.
2) Dry the structure out as quickly as possible—this is the most important thing you can do as structural mold will begin to form in the first 24-48 hours. Remove water-saturated sheetrock 18 inches above the highest watermark to increase structural drying.
3) Turn up the heat and use a dehumidifier—when drying out a structure and/or its contents, reduce the indoor humidity to less than 60% and use heat to speed the drying process. Hot, dry air dries things faster than cold moist air.
4) Circulate the air—turn on fans and dehumidifiers or open windows if there is no electricity to get air moving around to increase drying.
5) Don’t seal it up until its dry—siding, sheetrock, and flooring repairs should be done only after the substrates are completely dry. Only use plastic to prevent further water damage.
6) Don’t use bleach—it is an effective sanitizer but will not remove mold at its root. The mold will look like its gone but it won’t be.
7) Check your attic—undetected roof leaks can become big structural mold problems later
8) Inspect windows on the outside of the structure—check for possible water seepage through the caulking/seals.
9) Remove all mold growth on building materials by mechanical means—such as sanding or complete removal.
10) Use sanitizers—on any portion of the structure contaminated by sewage or flood waters.

For more information on water damage and flood resources, please see www.Flood.NORMI.org or to locate a certified mold inspector or remediator in your area, log onto www.normipro.com or call 1.877.251.2296 x 876