Archive for June, 2013

NORMIPro Environmental TASC Force Seminars a Success

Monday, June 24th, 2013

EFT Seminars

Lance Eisen, educating our attendees.

On June 19th and 20th the NORMIPro Environmental TASC Force hosted two Free Public Seminars and a CMI contractors class in Monmouth County NJ. It was well attended by members of the public and officials from several non-profit and government organizations. Channel 12 News covered the event.

We noticed a lack of credible information and consistent direction for the victims of Super Storm Sandy in the NJ/NY Metro area. Many untrained and uninsured contractors have been offering quick, but inadequate solutions to the desperate property owners. Victims of Super Storm Sandy are continuing to be victimized by unqualified contractors because of the lack of contractor regulations and a feeling of urgency to resolve problems as quickly as possible. The uncertainty caused by the stress of decision-making is causing emotional stress and other health issues for the victims. Without the proper information, homeowners don’t know whether to hire a contractor, repair it themselves, wait for the insurance adjuster, or wait for the government to release funds. When help does come, a homeowner with faulty information is unable to defend themselves against the inadequate solutions being offered.

Public education, contractor training, and consistent regulations are desperately needed in the industry. Our goal is to help the agencies supporting the disaster recovery efforts and the law makers in achieving these goals. The best tool in the disaster recovery process is information.

We want to thank all of the attendees that were at the events on the 19th and 20th, and again extend our support to the agencies working with the recovery efforts.

Hurricane Video Posted at Hurricane.NORMI.org

Saturday, June 22nd, 2013

June 22, 2013 Abita Springs, LA

NORMI, the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (www.NORMI.org) has posted a new hurricane preparedness video on their homepage to help the public be prepared for hurricane season. The information included therein is a compilation of information collected from government and public sources in an effort to centralize information people need before evacuations are called.

“We experienced Hurricane Katrina and have helped folks in New Jersey after Hurricane Sandy,” said Executive Director Doug Hoffman, “so we know what people should be thinking about before a hurricane approaches and how they should be prepared. The results of inaction can be worse if the storm is stronger than anticipated or more wide-spread. Hurricanes are so unpredictable that it’s vital we plan to protect ourselves and our families.”

For more information contact NORMI at support@normi.org or call 877.251.2296

Top Ten Things to Avoid Toxic Structural Mold from Flooding

Saturday, June 22nd, 2013

June 22, 2013 (Abita Springs, LA)—A few simple steps can save property owners thousands of dollars of damage due to structural mold growth, according to Doug Hoffman, executive director of the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (www.NORMI.org), a nonprofit organization involved in providing training and certifications for mold and indoor air quality professionals. Taking the necessary steps to avoid structural mold growth will not only preserve the integrity of a building but also the health of its occupants, further explains Kurt and Lee Ann Billings, authors of the book MOLD: The War Within, which details lessons learned from Katrina. Disaster area residents must be proactive, act quickly, and use proper personal protection equipment when implementing the following ten steps:

1) Remove any standing water—use a pump or a wet vac.
2) Remove wet carpets, rugs, draperies and personal belongings. Clear mud and debris from floors and foundation walls to allow the subflooring and foundation to dry.
3) Remove and discard water-saturated sheetrock and insulation—18 inches above the highest watermark to increase structural drying. Remove water-damaged flexible ductwork.
4) Remove all mold growth on remaining structural building materials—by mechanical means or complete removal if necessary. The easiest and most effective way to initially clean mold from structural building materials is with the use of a commercial wet/dry HEPA vacuum, followed by wiping, scrubbing, scrapping or sanding for complete removal.
5) Don’t use bleach to clean mold—it is an effective sanitizer but will not remove mold at its “root”. The mold will look like its gone but it won’t be.
6) Use sanitizers—on any portion of the structure contaminated by sewage or flood waters.
7) Dry the structure out as quickly as possible—as structural mold will begin to form in the first 24-48 hours. As soon as the above removal steps are completed, turn up the heat, circulate the air with fans, and use a dehumidifier to keep the indoor humidity below 60 percent. Hot, dry air dries things faster than cold moist air. If there’s no electricity, open windows and doors to get air moving to speed up the drying process.
8) Check your attic—undetected roof leaks can become big structural mold problems later.
9) Inspect windows on the outside of the structure—check for damaged caulking and seals that could lead to future water leaks.
10) Don’t seal it up until its dry—siding, sheetrock, and flooring repairs should be done only after the substrates are completely dry. Confirm moisture content by using a moisture meter.

For more information on water damage and flood resources, please see www.Flood.NORMI.org or to locate a certified mold inspector or remediator in your area, log onto www.normipro.com or call 1.877.251.2296.

Top Ten Tips to Avoid Structural Mold from Spring Flooding

Friday, June 7th, 2013

June 7, 2013 (Abita Springs, LA)—A few simple steps can save property owners thousands of dollars of damage due to structural mold growth, according to Doug Hoffman, executive director of the National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors (www.NORMI.org), a nonprofit organization involved in providing training and certifications for mold and indoor air quality professionals. Taking the necessary steps to avoid structural mold growth will not only preserve the integrity of a building but also the health of its occupants, further explains Kurt and Lee Ann Billings, authors of the book MOLD: The War Within, which details lessons learned from Katrina. Disaster area residents must be proactive, act quickly, and use proper personal protection equipment when implementing the following ten steps:

1) Remove any standing water—use a pump or a wet vac.
2) Remove wet carpets, rugs, draperies and personal belongings. Clear mud and debris from floors and foundation walls to allow the subflooring and foundation to dry.
3) Remove and discard water-saturated sheetrock and insulation—18 inches above the highest watermark to increase structural drying. Remove water-damaged flexible ductwork.
4) Remove all mold growth on remaining structural building materials—by mechanical means or complete removal if necessary. The easiest and most effective way to initially clean mold from structural building materials is with the use of a commercial wet/dry HEPA vacuum, followed by wiping, scrubbing, scrapping or sanding for complete removal.
5) Don’t use bleach to clean mold—it is an effective sanitizer but will not remove mold at its “root”. The mold will look like its gone but it won’t be.
6) Use sanitizers—on any portion of the structure contaminated by sewage or flood waters.
7) Dry the structure out as quickly as possible—as structural mold will begin to form in the first 24-48 hours. As soon as the above removal steps are completed, turn up the heat, circulate the air with fans, and use a dehumidifier to keep the indoor humidity below 60 percent. Hot, dry air dries things faster than cold moist air. If there’s no electricity, open windows and doors to get air moving to speed up the drying process.
8) Check your attic—undetected roof leaks can become big structural mold problems later.
9) Inspect windows on the outside of the structure—check for damaged caulking and seals that could lead to future water leaks.
10) Don’t seal it up until its dry—siding, sheetrock, and flooring repairs should be done only after the substrates are completely dry. Confirm moisture content by using a moisture meter.

For more information on water damage and flood resources, please see www.Flood.NORMI.org or to locate a certified mold inspector or remediator in your area, log onto www.normipro.com or call 1.877.251.2296.

NORMI to Hold Free Seminars for New Jersey Residents

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

(New Orleans) NORMIProETF (The NORMIPro Environmental TASC Force), a not-for-profit 501(3)c will hold FREE seminars on Wednesday and Thursday nights, June 19th and 20th from 7:00-8:30pm at Monmouth County Library (Headquarters) located at 125 Symmes Drive, Manalpan, New Jersey. These are open to the public and each will cover a different subject.

On Wednesday evening the 30 minutes presentation will be on “How to Protect Yourself” from the threats associated with mold and bacteria contaminated building materials which need to be removed from the site. Those with suppressed immune systems are especially vulnerable to long term effects and should know how to evaluate the damage before proceeding with do-it-yourself cleanup.

On Thursday evening the 30 minutes presentation will be on “Techniques for Safely Removing Mold” from contaminated sites and precautions that should be taken by do-it-yourself property owners. Each seminar will be followed by a Q&A with a panel of experts on hand to answer specific questions in these areas.

Following the presentation, Doug Hoffman, Executive Director of NORMI (National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors) will moderate a Q&A from the audience. The panel of speakers will include experts from the area who have been trained in the evaluation and removal of mold and bacteria contaminated materials and provides resources that include accurate and timely information regarding these subjects.

NORMI is committed to the safety factors involved with the rebuilding of New Jersey area after the devastation of Hurricane Sandy. With contractors pouring into the city, the importance of certified and licensed mold professionals is at an all time high due to the potentially severe health effects from inexperienced individuals.

On Thursday, July 20th from 9am-4pm NORMI will conduct a Certified Mold Inspector course at Holiday Inn Hazlet located 2870 Highway 35 South, Hazlet, New Jersey. The cost of the one-day course is $149.

For more information contact NORMI 877-251-2296 or www.NORMI.org or Best Training School 888.856.4803 or www.BestTrainingSchool.com to register for the one-day course. The Monmouth Library can be reached at 732-431-7500 x 7242. Go to www.NORMIProETF.org to contribute.

About NORMI
The National Organization of Remediators and Mold Inspectors serves as a cooperative network of first responders in the war against indoor air quality and mold problems.
NORMI classes train and certify students in the process of assessment and screening for household mold and toxic mold, evaluating mold problems, the damage caused by mold and other air and water quality issues. This solution-based training offers suggestions to solve problems that have been identified by the assessor. NORMI has become the nation’s premier certifying agency for indoor air quality and mold professionals by providing the very best education, training, and support to enhance awareness of problems and solutions that benefit public health.